Mughal Architecture : Fatehpur Sikri

The Mughal architecture flourished in the Indian subcontinent during the Mughal rule (1526-1857). It was a combination of Indo, Islamic and Persian style of art. This new style combined elements of Islamic art and architecture, which had been introduced to India during days of Sultanate of Delhi, with features of Persian art and architecture.

The Mughals built magnificent forts, palaces, gates, public buildings, mosques, water tanks and many more buildings. The use of running water in their palaces and pleasure resorts was a special feature of the Mughals.

Akbar was the first Mughal ruler who undertook constructions on a large scale and the first great Mughal monument was the mausoleum to Humayun. Most notable of Akbar’s buildings was the palace-cum-fort complex at Fatehpuri Sikri. Native red sandstone was inlaid with white marble and all the surfaces were ornately carved on the outside and sumptuously painted inside. Extensive use was made of the low arches and bulbous domes that characterize the Mughal style during his period. Soon this style of architecture was used extensively by the nobles and common people.

 The royal city of Fatehpur Sikri is located 26 miles (42 km) west of Agra, was built in the late 1500s. The numerous structures at Fatehpur Sikri best illustrate the style of his works, and the great mosque there is scarcely matched in elegance and architectural effect; the south gateway is well known, and from its size and structure excels any similar entrance in India. 

Fatehpur Sikri: Inside Out

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Main-entranceTansen's-StageMughal-Architecture5Mughal-Architecture4Mughal-Architecture2Roof-DesignCarved-WallsDurbar-outsideBalcony-internalAkbar's-Secret-Discussion-RAkbar's-BankA-doorCorner-balconyCraftmanshipFatehpur-Sikri-entrance

Verandah

..do wonder how they managed all this without a tower crane!?!?!

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6 thoughts on “Mughal Architecture : Fatehpur Sikri

  1. they probably managed without a crane because there weren’t 8 guys watching 2 guys do the work… they were probably all 10 actually working!! the lines an repetitive shapes in these photographs almost makes it impossible to stop looking at them. beautiful!!

  2. Australia is too young for scenes like these…it’s hard to imagine living with that sort of history.

    I like how you have chosen to focus on some individual components of the buildings, rather than in each case presenting only the whole. Good viewing!

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